astronomy

Moon

This is my favourite world, our Moon. It is about four and a half billion years old, yet always looks nice and shiny, despite being a bit awkward to clean. It would still be part of the Earth if it were not for a giant impact, from a planet about the size of Mars. The explosion threw so much debris into orbit that it eventually condensed to form the Moon. But for a while there would have been beautiful rings around the Earth, a bit like Saturn’s.

This photo, filtered for blue light, clearly shows the large dark areas on the Moon’s face. They are called in Latin maria (seas) although in fact they are flat lava plains. There are hardly any on the far side of the Moon, which is weird. It is like someone has arranged the Moon to give us the best view.

This picture is adjusted for high contrast to show the enormous Tycho crater, left of bottom centre and surrounded by bright rays of material ejected by a meteoroid impact. The Moon is covered in craters as it is constantly bombarded with comets, asteroids and other space junk. If you go to the Moon please be aware that it is a hard hat area.

It is amazing what you can see on the Moon with even a small pair of binoculars or a telephoto lens. The three round dark areas right of centre, like bits of pepperoni, are (left to right) the Sea of Serenity, the Sea of Tranquility, and the Sea of Fertility. The small pepperoni to the right of them is the Sea of Crises. The big white spot left of centre is the crater Copernicus, which is about half the size of Scotland, if not quite as nice for a holiday. The small bright dot at ten o’clock is crater Aristarchus, named after the Greek astronomer who first calculated the distance to the Moon. He got it wrong, but that was only due to the poor tape measures available at the time.

Oddmints

Venus and Mercury. It is unusual to see Mercury so clearly (bottom right), as it was approaching maximum elongation (when the Sun, Earth and Mercury form a right angle). Uranus would also be in frame, as it was approaching conjunction with Venus, except it is far too dim to show up in this exposure of course. Neptune, if it were bright enough to see, would have just set.

The long exposure has given a pretty effect to a passing plane (top left).

Snowy Finchley!

A St. Valenteen’s Day card that I made for someone, it turned out they did not want it. It says ‘Lettuce bee Valentines’!

Magpie Mosaic. This is my hommage (French for ripoff) of South African photographer Johann Mader’s Mopane Mosaic. I like that he lists among his equipment, ‘beanbag’. In my picture, can you spot the cheeky magpie? :D

Look! A plane!

Oh noes! The Moon is going out

Being as how I am always banging on about the Moon and how great it is and how it is my favourite heavenly body (except maybe hott actress Jaime Murray obviously), it is a bit puzzling that I did not know there is a lunar eclipse happening tonight!

I noticed as I was popping to Tescos for an intresting snack that there was a little dark bite out of the Moon. I thought perhaps it was just a bit of cloud or something, but on the way back I realised it is a completely clear night. Then when I saw on one of the astro communities on my friends page about the eclipse, I promptly rushed out with the camera! (stopping only to take essential eclipse viewing equipmint such as BEER ekcetera).



It is great really as it is like the Universe itself is cheering me up! I just popped out for another look and it is close to totality right now. The darkened Moon has an eerie reddish glow for the same reason that sunsets do: its light is being scattered by dust in the Earth’s atmosphere. Of course we are not scared of eclipses because we are fantastically lucky enough to live in the 0.002% of human history which encompasses actually visiting the Moon, and playing golf there. But it must have been terribly frightening in nanshunt times when for no discernible reason the sky goddess became engulfed by darkness in a matter of minutes, and they must have been super relieved when she came back again.

I think that calls for another BEER :D